City Creek Nature Notes – Salt Lake City

March 15, 2017

March 15th

Filed under: Ants, People, picnic site 4, Pollution, Smells, spiders, Stream, Water Skimmer — canopus56 @ 7:47 pm

A Day for the Senses

2:00 p.m. Record high temperature – 73 degrees Fahrenheit, and twenty degrees above average. Warm sun beats down. Insects continue to respond to these record highs. Box Elder bugs pass their R reproduction explosion yesterday and are diminished, but now the spiders respond. I stop counting at fifty small spiders scurrying across the road. They are oblivious to the larger world around them, and in places, I have to jump from side to side to avoid crushing them. Ants become active and run onto the round. At the pond at picnic site 4, three Water striders, the first of the new year, return. Butterflies sparsely float along the road. As yesterday, the warmth brings out numerous people and on another workday, many families with strollers are out. The stream still runs high with the early snowpack melt, and at rock pours, City Creek begins to look like its high mountain relatives. The water cascades over rocks and falls into agitated white pools. The stream is usually brown colored from the milky dust in the runoff that is only slightly opaque, but the water is set off against the brown of the creek bottom. This contrasts with the water of the boiling white, agitating eddies that creek into blue-green wedges. The silver ribbon returns for some stream sections (Dec. 26th).

At picnic site 4, I stop to do a chore. There is plastic child’s bucket that has been tangled in the low-hanging bushes on the far bank of the stream. I have grown tired of this piece of trash, and today, I have brought my river sandals. I change shoes and then wade across the two foot deep pond to remove the trash. The runoff is only slightly cold and afterward I am refreshed. As I wade across, a great plume of silt is raised, and the pond turns light brown for about five minutes. I now understand Salt Lake’s 1894 Mayor Baskin’s February 6th, 1895 comment that the City’s “inhabitants have been compelled to drink and use for culinary purposes very muddy, unwholesome and unpalatable water,” and why the City prohibited fishing in the stream beginning in 1895 (Salt Lake Tribune, June 19, 1895). Although the stream bed is made of rocks, the rocks are not natural. In 1896, this section of stream was lined with rip-rapp in order to reduce both sediment and to keep stream water from seeping into the true silt base hidden below the rocks (Salt Lake Herald, May 20 and July 26, 1896). Over the last one-hundred and ten years, the rip-rap has been covered with silt.

At milepost 1.5, a fresh katabatic wind blows up canyon, and between wind, the warm sun, and relaxing wade in the cool mountain stream, I mind cannot help to wander and just enjoy this feast for the senses.

In Thoreau’s “Journal” on March 15th, 1857, he observes trout swimming in a zig-zag pattern. On March 15th, 1860, he admires a circling hen-hawk.

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